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Research Canons

Books and articles that are essential to a new academic in various areas of legal inquiry as suggested by contributors to PrawfsBlawg.

Articles

  1. William L. F. Felstiner & Austin Sarat, Enactments of Power: Negotiating Reality and Responsibility in Lawyer-Client Interactions, 77 Cornell L. Rev. 1447 (1992).
  2. Monroe H. Freedman, Professional Responsibility of the Criminal Defense Lawyer: The Three Hardest Questions, 64 Mich. L. Rev. 1469 (1966) (a few doctrinal articles are sufficiently important that they cannot be ignored, even by theoretical types; suggested by Brad). 
  3. Charles Fried, The Lawyer as Friend: The Moral Foundations of the Lawyer-Client Relation, 85 Yale L.J. 1060 (1976) (suggested by Brad).
  4. Robert W. Gordon, The Independence of Lawyers, 68 B.U. L. Rev. 1 (1988) (suggested by Brad).
  5. Susan P. Koniak, The Law Between the Bar and the State, 70 N.C. L. Rev. 1389 (1992) (a few doctrinal articles are sufficiently important that they cannot be ignored, even by theoretical types; suggested by Brad). 
  6. Daniel Markovits, Legal Ethics from the Lawyer’s Point of View, 15 Yale J. L. & Human. 209 (2003) (suggested by Brad).
  7. John B. Mitchell, Reasonable Doubts Are Where You Find Them: A Response to Professor Subin's Position on the Criminal Lawyer's 'Different Mission', 1 Geo. J. Leg. Ethics 339 (1987) (the Subin-Mitchell debate in the Geo. J. Legal Ethics is the best discussion I've seen of the competing values of truth and procedural justice in the criminal defense context; suggested by Brad). 
  8. Gerald J. Postema, Moral Responsibility in Professional Ethics, 55 NYU L. Rev. 63 (1980) (suggested by Brad).
  9. Stephen L. Pepper, The Lawyer’s Amoral Ethical Role: A Defense, A Problem, and Some Possibilities, 1986 Am. B. Found. Res. J. 613 (suggested by Brad).
  10. Robert Post, On the Popular Image of the Lawyer: Reflections in a Dark Glass, 75 Cal. L. Rev. 379 (1987) (suggested by Alan Childress). 
  11. Ted Schneyer, Moral Philosophy's Standard Misconception of Legal Ethics, 1984 Wis. L. Rev. 1529 (1984) (a few doctrinal articles are sufficiently important that they cannot be ignored, even by theoretical types; suggested by Brad). 
  12. Thomas L. Shaffer, The Practice of Law as Moral Discourse, 55 Notre Dame L. Rev. 231 (1979) (and many other articles by Tom Shaffer; suggested by Brad). 
  13. Harry I. Subin, The Criminal Lawyer's 'Different Mission': Reflections on the "Right" to Present a False Case, 1 Geo. J. Legal Ethics 125 (1987) (the Subin-Mitchell debate in the Geo. J. Legal Ethics is the best discussion I've seen of the competing values of truth and procedural justice in the criminal defense context; suggested by Brad). 
  14. Richard Wasserstrom, Lawyers as Professionals: Some Moral Issues, 5 Hum. Rts. 1 (1975) (suggested by Brad).
  15. David B. Wilkins, Legal Realism for Lawyers, 104 Harv. L. Rev. 468 (1990) (suggested by Brad).
  16. Bernard Williams, Professional Morality and Its Dispositions, in The Good Lawyer 259 (David Luban, ed., 1983) (the essays collected in Good Lawyer are kind of collectively canonical; suggested by Brad).

Books

  1. Richard L. Abel, American Lawyers (1989) (suggested by John Steele).
  2. Richard L. Abel & Philip S. C. Lewis, Lawyers In Society: An Overview (1995) (quick read on comparative legal professions; suggested by Alan Childress).    
  3. Richard L. Abel & Philip S. C. Lewis Lawyers in Society: the Common Law World (1988) (but their full 3-volume collection is a must-shelve too; suggested by Alan Childress).  
  4. Lawyers: A Critical Reader  (Richard Abel ed. 1997) (excerpts from several works that, in their complete form, deserve canonical status; suggested by The Continental Op.). 
  5. Various works by Jerald Auerbach (for sociological literature; suggested by Alan Childress).
  6. Alan-Hermann Chroust, The Rise of the Legal Profession in America, vol. 1 and 2 (1965) (suggested by John Steele).
  7. Henry S. Drinker Legal Ethics (1953) (additionally, there's a book by either Drinker or Biddle, written about 50 years ago, and titled something like "A History of the Legal Profession."; suggested by John Steele). 
  8. Lawrence M. Friedman, A History of American Law (3rd ed. 2005) (suggested by John Steele).
  9. Marc Galanter & Thomas Palay, Tournament of Lawyers: The Transformation of the Big Law Firm (1994) (suggested by John Steele). 
  10. Various works by Marc Galanter  (for sociological literature; suggested by Alan Childress). 
  11. Thomas Geoghegan, Which Side Are You On? (1992) (probably not "canonical", but worthy of mention; non-scholarly, but offers an interesting perspective from a practitioner; suggested by The Continental Op.).   
  12. John P. Heinz & Edward O. Laumann, Chicago Lawyers: The Social Structure of the Bar (1982) (suggested by Alan Childress).  
  13. John P. Heinz & Edward O. Laumann, Chicago Lawyers: The Social Structure of the Bar (Revised Edition 1994) (suggested by John Steele).
  14. Various works by David Hoffman (suggested by John Steele
  15. Morton J. Horwitz, Transformation of American Law, 1780–1860 (1979) (suggested by John Steele).
  16. Morton J. Horwitz, Transformation in American Legal History, 1870-1960: The Crisis of Legal Orthodoxy (1992) (suggested by John Steele).
  17. Michael J. Kelly, Lives of Lawyers (1996) (suggested by The Continental Op.).  
  18. Anthony T. Kronman, The Lost Lawyer: Failing Ideals of the Legal Profession (1993) (suggested by Brad). 
  19. David Luban, Lawyers and Justice: An Ethical Study (1988) (suggested by Brad). 
  20. Roscoe Pound, The Lawyer from Antiquity to Modern Times (1953) (suggested by John Steele).
  21. Douglas E. Rosenthal, Lawyer and Client: Who's in Charge? (1984) (suggested by Alan Childress).  
  22. Cause Lawyering: Political Commitments and Professional Responsibilities (Austin Sarat & Stuartt Scheingold eds. 1997) (and their other stuff on "cause lawyers" (suggested by The Continental Op.).
  23. Various works by George Sharswood (suggested by John Steele).
  24. William H. Simon, The Practice of Justice: A Theory of Lawyer Justice (1998) (suggested by Brad). 
  25. Erwin O. Smigel, The Wall Street Lawyer: Professional Organization Man? (1964) (suggested by John Steele).
  26. Robert Stevens, Law School: Legal Education in America from the 1850s to the 1980s (2001) (suggested by John Steele).
  27. Thomas Geoghegan, Which Side Are You On? (1992) (probably not "canonical", but worthy of mention; non-scholarly, but offers an interesting perspective from a practitioner; suggested by The Continental Op.).