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Journal Subciting Guide: WHERE TO FIND SOURCES

Searching the catalogs and requesting items from other libraries

LEDs and ILL for law journal students

If your source is available through the FSU Libraries Catalog or UBorrow, you may be able to request it through LEDs (library express delivery service).  If it is not available through the FSU Libraries Catalog or UBorrow, you may be able to request through the Research Center's ILL (inter-library loan) service.

Please click here for information and instructions for each service.
 

Identifying sources from citations

If you find incomplete or unrecognizable citations, don't panic.  We suggest starting your citation work with the unproblematic citations and tackling the problems only after you've gotten a handle on your author's research world.

Unrecognizable citations: First check The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation (KF245.U5, various editions).  If that doesn't work, check Prince's Bieber Dictionary of Legal Abbreviations (KF246.B46 2009): the Research Center has two copies, one on reserve (two-hour loan) and another in the Reference section on the second floor.  You can also try World Dictionary of Legal Abbreviations (K89.K38 1991), in the stacks on the second floor, but be aware that it is current only through 2010.

Incomplete citations: If your article contains a direct quote from the source for which your citation is incomplete, try searching for that quote (using quotation marks around the language, of course).  You may find the same language quoted in another article, and the citation in that other article may be complete.

Incorrect citations: If you still can't identify the source, it's possible that the citation is just be plain wrong.  As with  incomplete citations, you can try searching for the exact phrase quoted.  Otherwise, you may need to contact the author for clarification.

Once you find the source, be sure you can identify what type it is -- journal article, book chapter, newspaper article, proceedings from a symposium, etc. -- because not all sources can be found in all databases.  If the Bluebook doesn't clarify any questions you may have, you can contact the law journal liaison librarian (see bottom right corner of this guide).  Of course, you can always ask a librarian.

Once you've identified what type of source you need to find, go get it!  See the Finding Sources tab for more information.

FSU Libraries Catalog Search

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OneSearch

OneSearch

 

Advanced Search

What is OneSearch?
OneSearch searches across the majority of FSU Libraries' subscribed databases in addition to the university-wide catalog. so it retrieves books, journal articles, and more, including material outside our collections but likely available through UBorrow or ILL.

Finding articles

Law journals: HeinOnline is a reliable source.  You can do a general search al search in All Subscribed Collections (the default database) or click on Law Journal Library if you know the source you're seeking is a traditional law journal.  Don't forget that the Index to Legal Periodicals, another good source for journal material, is part of HeinOnline.

Some specialized law journals (e.g., journals of "Law and _____") may not be in HeinOnline.  Try searching the FSU Libraries catalog by journal title and OneSearch by article title (not journal title) or by author.

Westlaw is also reliable, and has the advantage of links to many citations within an article, but goes back only to 1985.  For earlier articles, go to HeinOnline or, as detailed in the next paragraph, the law journal's own website.

Many, if not most, student-run law journals now post current and back issues on their journal websites or as part of their school's institutional repository.

  • Some include all issues and articles back to the founding of the journal, but most include at least the most recent years' output.  You should be able to find a journals website and the school's repository by searching the name of the journal within quotation marks and either "institutional repository" or "archive" in Google or another search engine.
  • In addition, most law schools make their faculty members' scholarship available in the school's institutional repository, so if the author is a law professor, check for an institutional repository at his or her school.

Non-law academic journals: remember to check OneSearch by the title of the article, not the title of the journal.  If FSU doesn't have access to the article, you can submit an ILL request.

Finding cases

  • Most U.S. case law can be found by entering the citation in a commercial database like Westlaw or Lexis. 
  • For Foreign of International Court case law, use the Bluebook to determine the name of the publication the case appears in. 

Finding books

Unless you specify otherwise, the FSU LIbraries catalog searches for the terms you type occurring anywhere  -- in "any field" -- in a library record (a record is a catalog entry).  To avoid being inundated with irrelevant search results, use the drop-down menu to search instead by title or by author.  If you don't find the item, then expand your search to include any field.

If the book is not available on campus and not available from another public Florida college or university through UBorrow, you can request it through ILL.  Instructions for submitting ILL requests can be found here -- scroll toward the bottom of the page for the "Interlibrary Loan" information. 

If the book was published in the United States before 1924, it has fallen into the public domain and may be available through Google Books (search by title or author within quotation marks -- e.g., "Gulliver's Travels" or "William Blackstone") or HathiTrust (you can search the HathiTrust catalog or do a full-text search; see "search tips" on the homepage).

OneSearch

OneSearch

 

Advanced Search

What is OneSearch?
OneSearch searches across the majority of FSU Libraries' subscribed databases in addition to the university-wide catalog. so it retrieves books, journal articles, and more, including material outside our collections but likely available through UBorrow or ILL.

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