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Gender and Law: An Interdisciplinary Research Guide: Carousel

This interdisciplinary guide focuses on the legal issues of gender and sexuality in both theory and practice.

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Blackwell Handbooks in Linguistics

Significantly expanded and updated, the second edition of The Handbook of Language, Gender and Sexuality brings together a team of the leading specialists in the field to create a comprehensive overview of key historical themes and issues, along with methodologies and cutting-edge research topics. Examines the dynamic ways that women and men develop and manage gendered identities through their talk, presenting data and case studies from interactions in a range of social contexts and different communities Substantially updated for the second edition, including a new introduction, 24 newly-commissioned chapters, ten updated chapters, and a comprehensive index Includes new chapters on research in non-English speaking countries - from Asia to South America - and cutting-edge topics such as language, gender, and popular culture; language and sexual identities; and language, gender, and socio-phonetics New sections focus on key themes and issues in the field, such as methodological approaches to language and gender, incorporating new chapters on conversation analysis, critical discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, and variation theory Provides unrivalled geographic coverage and an essential resource for a wide range of disciplines, from linguistics, psychology, sociology, and anthropology to communication and gender studies

Sister Wives, Surrogates and Sex Workers

Did she choose that?âe(tm) Or, more normatively, âe~Why would she choose that?âe(tm) This book critiques and offers an alternative to these questions, which have traditionally framed law and policy discussions circulating around controversial genderized practices. It examines the simplicity and incompleteness of choice-based rhetoric and of presumptions that womenâe(tm)s conduct is shaped, in an absolute way, either by choice or by coercion. This book develops an analytical framework that aims to discern the meaning and value that women may ascribe to morally ambiguous practices. An analysis of lawâe(tm)s approach to polygamy, surrogacy and sex work, particularly in Canada, the United Kingdom and Australia, provides a basis for evaluating the choice-coercion binary and for contemplating alternate modes for assessing, from a law and policy standpoint, the palatability of social practices that appear pernicious to women. Weaving together interdisciplinary research, an innovative analytical framework for assessing choices ostensibly harmful to women, and a critique of the legal rules governing such choices, this book bears relevance for students, scholars, practicing jurists and policymakers seeking a richer understanding of conduct that moves women to the margins of law and society.

The Subject of Anthropology

In this ambitious new book, Henrietta Moore draws on anthropology, feminism and psychoanalysis to develop an original and provocative theory of gender and of how we become sexed beings. Arguing that the Oedipus complex is no longer the fulcrum of debate between anthropology and psychoanalysis, she demonstrates how recent theorizing on subjectivity, agency and culture has opened up new possibilities for rethinking the relationship between gender, sexuality and symbolism. Using detailed ethnographic material from Africa and Melanesia to explore the strengths and weaknesses of a range of theories in anthropology, feminism and psychoanalysis, Moore advocates an ethics of engagement based on a detailed understanding of the differences and similarities in the ways in which local communities and western scholars have imaginatively deployed the power of sexual difference. She demonstrates the importance of ethnographic listening, of focused attention to people's imaginations, and of how this illuminates different facets of complex theoretical issues and human conundrums. Written not just for professional scholars and for students but for anyone with a serious interest in how gender and sexuality are conceptualized and experienced, this book is the most powerful and persuasive assessment to date of what anthropology has to contribute to these debates now and in the future.

The Economics of Women, Men, and Work

Intended primarily for courses found in Economics Departments and Departments of Women's Studies, on The Economics of Women, Women and Work, or the Economics of Gender, this text also provides practical content to current and aspiring industry professionals. The most current and comprehensive source available for research, data, and analysis on women, gender, and economics. Blau, Ferber, and Winkler are widely known for their research and contributions on the study of the economics of gender. As active researchers and leading scholars on the subject, the authors are in tune with the most current and relevant research that's included in Economics of Women, Men, and Work.

Gender, Inequality, and Wages

In all Western societies women earn lower wages on average than men. The gender wage gap has existed for many years, although there have been some important changes over time. This volume of collected papers contains extensive research on progress made by women in the labor market, and the characteristics and causes of remaining gender inequalities. It also covers other dimensions of inequality and their interplay with gender, such as family formation, wellbeing, race, and immigrant status. The author was awarded the 2010 IZA Prize in Labor Economics for this research. Part I comprises an Introduction by the Editors. Part II probes and quantifies the explanations for the gender wage gap, including differential choices made in the labor market by men and women as well as labor market discrimination and employment segregation. It also delineates how the gender wage gap has decreased over time in the United States and suggests explanations for this narrowing of the gap and themore recent slowdown in wage convergence. Part III considers international differences in the gender wage gap and wage inequality and the relationship between the two. Part IV considers a variety of indicators of gender inequality and how they have changed over time in the United States, painting a picture of significant gains in women's relative status across a number of dimensions. It also considers the trends in female labor supply and what they indicate about changing gender roles in the United States and considers a successful intervention designed to increase the relative success of academic women. Part V focuses on inequality by race and immigrant status. It considers not only race difference in wages and the differential progress made by African-American women and men in reducing the race wage gap, but also race differences in wealth which are considerably larger than differences in wages. It also examines immigrant-native differences in the use of transfer payments,and the impact of gender roles in immigrant source countries on immigrant women's labor market assimilation in the U.S. labor market.

Covered in Ink

A small dolphin on the ankle, a black line on the lower back, a flower on the hip, or a child's name on the shoulder blade--among the women who make up the twenty percent of all adults in the USA who have tattoos, these are by far the most popular  choices. Tattoos like these are cute, small, and can be easily hidden, and they fit right in with society's preconceived notions about what is 'gender appropriate' for women. But what about women who are heavily tattooed? Or women who visibly wear imagery, like skulls, that can be perceived as masculine or ugly when inked on their skin?         Drawing on autoethnography, and extensive interviews with heavily tattooed women, Covered in Ink provides insight into the increasingly visible subculture of women with tattoos. Author Beverly Thompson visits tattoos parlors, talking to female tattoo artists and the women they ink, and she attends tattoo conventions and Miss Tattoo pageants where heavily tattooed women congregate to share their mutual love for the art form. Along the way, she brings to life women's love of ink, their very personal choices of tattoo art, and the meaning tattooing has come to carry in their lives, as well as their struggles with gender norms, employment discrimination, and family rejection. Thompson finds that, despite the stigma and social opposition heavily tattooed women face, many feel empowered by their tattoos and strongly believe they are creating a space for self-expression that also presents a positive body image. A riveting and unique study, Covered in Ink provides important insight into the often unseen world of women and tattooing.    Instructor's Guide

Gender, Violence, and Human Security

The nature of human security is changing globally: interstate conflict and even intrastate conflict may be diminishing worldwide, yet threats to individuals and communities persist. Large-scale violence by formal and informal armed forces intersects with interpersonal and domestic forms of violence in mutually reinforcing ways. Gender, Violence, and Human Security takes a critical look at notions of human security and violence through a feminist lens, drawing on both theoretical perspectives and empirical examinations through case studies from a variety of contexts around the globe. nbsp; This fascinating volume goes beyond existing feminist international relations engagements with security studies to identify not only limitations of the human security approach, but also possible synergies between feminist and human security approaches. Noted scholars Aili Mari Tripp, Myra Marx Ferree, and Christina Ewig, along with their distinguished group of contributors, analyze specific case studies from around the globe, ranging from post-conflict security in Croatia to the relationship between state policy and gender-based crime in the United States. Shifting the focus of the term “human security” from its defensive emphasis to a more proactive notion of peace, the book ultimately calls for addressing the structural issues that give rise to violence. A hard-hitting critique of the ways in which global inequalities are often overlooked by human security theorists, Gender, Violence, and Human Security presents a much-needed intervention into the study of power relations throughout the world.

Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and the Law in a Nutshell

This Nutshell presents a very timely overview of legal topics relating to sexual orientation, gender identity and the law. Topics covered include: regulation of sexuality, gender identity and expression, parenthood, marriage, United States military, nondiscrimination statutes and ordinances, freedom of expression, freedom of association, and religious freedom. Discussion includes developments at the federal, state and local level. Statutes discussed include Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; Title IX; the Fair Housing Act; the Affordable Care Act; Don't Ask, Don't Tell; Defense of Marriage Act, as well as some of the anti-gay rights measures that have been adopted in various statutes such as North Carolina.

Nine to Five

Nine to Five provides a lively and accessible introduction to the laws and policies regulating sex, sexuality, and gender identity in the American workplace. Contemporary cases and events reveal the breadth and persistence of sexism and gender stereotyping. Through a series of essays organized around sex discrimination, sexual harassment, pregnancy discrimination, and pay equity, the book highlights legal rules and doctrines that privilege men over women and masculinity over femininity. In understanding the law - what it forbids, what it allows, and to what it turns a blind eye - we see why it is far too soon to declare the triumph of working women's equality. Despite significant gains for women, gender continues to define the work experience in both predictable and surprising ways. A witty and engaging guide to the legal terrain, Nine to Five also proposes solutions to the many obstacles that remain on the path to equality.

Redeeming the Dream

On November 4, 2008, California voters adopted the highly controversial Proposition 8, a ballot initiative banning same-sex marriage by amending the state constitution to provide that 'only marriage between a man and a woman is valid or recognized in California.' Supported by $40 million in financial backing from religious and other groups hostile to marriage equality, its proponents argued that if the measure wasn't adopted, public schools would soon be teaching children 'that gay marriage is okay.' The passage of Proposition 8 put the state's gay and lesbian citizens, their relationships, and their children in a second-class, inferior, and less-respected status. Shocked by the results of the vote, supporters of marriage equality prepared to challenge Proposition 8 as a violation of the constitutional rights of gays and lesbians enlisting two of the nation's preeminent lawyers: David Boies and Theodore B. Olson. At first glance, they seemed unlikely allies, having argued against each other in the landmark Bush v. Gore case, which effectively decided the 2000 presidential election. But the two men had since become close friends and, dedicated to American principles of equality, due process, and the rule of law, they joined forces to bring one of the key civil liberties cases of our time. Redeeming the Dream is the remarkable story of the five-year struggle to win the right for gays and lesbians to marry in California, from the development of the strategies to challenge Proposition 8, to its being declared unconstitutional in federal district court by Chief Judge Vaughn R. Walker, to ultimate success in the Supreme Court of the United States on June 26, 2013. Boies and Olson guide readers through all the key legal issues framing the fight, the behind-the-scenes planning of what they recognized from the outset as a landmark case, and the human values that were at the heart of their battle to put state-sanctioned discrimination on trial. Redeeming the Dream is the authoritative, dramatic, and inspiring up-close account of the most important civil rights case since Brown v. Board of Education and Loving v. Virginia, and a riveting story of law, justice, and above all else, love. Advance Praise for Redeeming the Dream 'Having argued against Ted Olson in the first of the two Bush v. Gore clashes in the Supreme Court, I wasn't sure what to expect as I watched Ted and my co-counsel for AI Gore, David Boies, take on this profoundly difficult but surpassingly important challenge so soon. Having tried to lay the groundwork in Bowers v. Hardwick, generating dissents that I trusted would prove helpful in the end, I found myself among those wary of the Court's readiness to lead the nation in this morally imperative direction. So I watched breathlessly as Ted and David mounted this audacious challenge. Reading their remarkable memoir so accessibly detailing every step of the journey they pursued together, I not only couldn't put it down but was inspired anew by their unique combination of moral courage and legal brilliance. Sometimes one is brought to tears by the rightness of a cause and the depth of its appeal to the human spirit, sometimes by the sheer genius of the strategy that alone can translate inspiration into implementation. Redeeming the Dream did both. Nobody who cares about law as an instrument of justice at its finest can afford not to read this breathtakingly inspiring book.' Laurence H. Tribe, Carl M. Loeb University Professor and Professor of Constitutional Law, Harvard Law School 'This is compelling and important American history about one of the defining social and legal issues of the twenty-first century, brought to the courtroom by two of our most gifted lawyers - once political opponents, now joined in a com

Same-Sex Marriage in the United States

Same-sex marriage has become one of the defining social issues in contemporary U.S. politics. State court decisions finding in favor of same-sex relationship equality claims have been central to the issue's ascent from nowhere to near the top of the national political agenda. Same Sex Marriage in the United States tells the story of the legal and cultural shift, its backlash, and how it has evolved over the past 15 years. There is a clear story of jurisprudential evolution with regards to same-sex marriage from Hawaii, through Vermont, Massachusetts, New Jersey, California, Connecticut, and, remarkably, Iowa in 2009. This book aids in a classroom examination of the legal, political, and social developments surrounding the issue of same-sex marriage in the United States. While books about same-sex marriage have proliferated in recent years, few, if any, have provided a clear and comprehensive account of the litigation for same-sex marriage, and its successes and failures, as this book does.

Speak Now

A renowned legal scholar tells the definitive story of Hollingsworth v. Perry, the trial that will stand as the most potent argument for marriage equality Speak Now tells the story of a watershed trial that unfolded over twelve tense days in California in 2010. A trial that legalized same-sex marriage in our most populous state. A trial that interrogated the nature of marriage, the political status of gays and lesbians, the ideal circumstances for raising children, and the ability of direct democracy to protect fundamental rights. A trial that stands as the most potent argument for marriage equality this nation has ever seen. In telling the story of Hollingsworth v. Perry, the groundbreaking federal lawsuit against Proposition 8, Kenji Yoshino has also written a paean to the vanishing civil trial--an oasis of rationality in what is often a decidedly uncivil debate. Above all, this book is a work of deep humanity, in which Yoshino brings abstract legal arguments to life by sharing his own story of finding love, marrying, and having children as a gay man. Intellectually rigorous and profoundly compassionate, Speak Now will stand as the definitive account of a landmark civil-rights trial. -- Winner, Silver Gavel Awards -- Winner, Stonewall Book Award

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