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Social Media: Law, Ethics and Current Awareness: Book Carousel

This research guide will focus on the issues law students and lawyers face when using social media. #socialmedialaw

Book Carousel

Global Internet Law in a Nutshell

Global Internet Law in a Nutshell begins with a review of the history, technology, and competing theories of the Internet that enables a deeper understanding of case law and statutory developments discussed in the substantive chapters. It briefly covers the history of the Internet through the rapidly evolving Web 3.0, competing theories of Internet governance, cyber jurisdiction and enforcement of judgments, choice and conflicts of law, cybertorts, online contracting and licensing including social media terms of use, the protection of online intellectual property assets, global consumer law, the protection of online privacy, criminal liability for Internet activity, and European Community statutes such as the General Data Protection Regulation, E-Commerce Directive, Brussels Regulation, and Rome I Regulation. The Third Edition presents a concise discussion of cloud computing and social media terms of use. Each chapter of this revised edition updates the key cases and statutory developments from the United States, Europe, and around the world. This book is an ideal beginning textbook as well as starting point for most Internet-related research. This short treatise provides a succinct summary of e-commerce law developments around the world.

Information Doesn't Want to Be Free

"Filled with wisdom and thought experiments and things that will mess with your mind.” -- Neil Gaiman, author of The Graveyard Book and American Gods In sharply argued, fast-moving chapters, Cory Doctorow’s Information Doesn’t Want to Be Free takes on the state of copyright and creative success in the digital age. Can small artists still thrive in the Internet era? Can giant record labels avoid alienating their audiences? This is a book about the pitfalls, and the opportunities, creative industries (and individuals) are confronting today--about how the old models have failed or found new footing, and about what might soon replace them. An essential read for anyone with a stake in the future of the arts, Information Doesn’t Want to Be Free offers a vivid guide to the ways creativity and the Internet interact today, and to what might be coming next.

Social Media Law

Social Media Law examines social and new media issues through the lens of law and policy. With the recent explosion in social networking and the use of social media and new media, it is essential for attorneys and law students to understand the trends in these new platforms when advising clients of the potential risks and pitfalls of social media and social networking use. In six comprehensive sections copyright and fair use, freedom of speech, business law, in the courtroom, privacy, and cybercrime Social Media Law addresses the current and pressing issues in this dynamic area of law. If you are even remotely involved or interested in the legalities of social media you need this exhaustive textbook "

Media and Public Shaming

The media today are frequently in conflict with people in the public eye - be they politicians and celebrities - over the disclosure of private information and behaviour. Historically, journalists have had latitude to 'name and shame' malfeasance of public officials and criminal behaviour, but disputes are increasingly emerging over disclosure of non-criminal personal behaviour, family issues and sexual orientation, leading commentators to question what information can really be described as being in the 'public interest'. In this book, leading academics, commentators and journalists consider the extent to which privacy is warranted for activities outside the scope of their professional lives or when disclosure reveals duplicity related to reputations, brands, images and public personas built and conveyed through media by political and celebrity figures.

Regulating Social Media

Convergence, participatory culture, multimedia technologies, and social media platforms are creating new communicative opportunities that fundamentally influence citizenship and journalism. Social media present a staggering breadth of legal and ethical matters to consider. The limits and laws of free expression in this new media landscape are beginning to emerge both domestically and internationally, causing us to ask the following questions: How do we conceive of privacy? Should the law protect citizen journalists? How do social media affect ethical obligations of journalists and public relations professionals?<BR> These are just a few of the issues raised by the new social media landscape. Myriad standards of professional ethics command compliance in order for various media industries to function. Scholarly researchers of social media have not yet focused on the rights of expression and ethical obligations of the new media environment.<BR> This volume will address the scope and nature of this developing environment of expression with chapter topics ranging from privacy, cyber-bullying, and harassment to defamation, intellectual property rights, and online safety.

Social Media As Evidence

For lawyers, the proverbial "smoking gun document" of the pre-internet era has given way to the "smoking gun tweet." In recent years, Facebook, Twitter, blogs, and other social media channels have become an evidentiary gold mine for impeaching witnesses and undermining a company's litigation position. Social Media as Evidence: Cases, Practice Pointers, and Techniques will assist any lawyer who encounters social media in their daily law practice.

Social Media Law in a Nutshell

Social media has transformed how the world communicates. Its impact has been felt in every corner of our society including the law. Social Media Law in a Nutshell is a wide-ranging look of how the social media transformation has impacted various legal fields. From marketing to employment to torts to criminal law to copyright and beyond, virtually every legal field has been changed by social media. By looking at high level concerns and example cases, Social Media Law in a Nutshell attempts to give practitioners exposure to social media issues and concerns so they can better advise clients and approach the new social media world with their legal eyes opened to new and old risks alike. This book can also serve as a text for law professors looking to expose law students to the burgeoning area of Social Media Law.

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